sketchbook
Creator of Utilitarian Dry Goods
sketchbook
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exhibition-ism:

Louise Bourgeois: Works on Paper currently at the Tate Modern through 15 April 2015 
exhibition-ism:

Louise Bourgeois: Works on Paper currently at the Tate Modern through 15 April 2015 
exhibition-ism:

Louise Bourgeois: Works on Paper currently at the Tate Modern through 15 April 2015 
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archive-club:

Issey Miyakeᴀʀᴄʜɪᴠᴇ ᴄʟᴜʙ
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70s-blues:

Hold Me Close | via Tumblr on We Heart It.
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Christian Strenge (1757–1828)
East Petersburg, Pennsylvania
c. 1790
Watercolor and ink on cut paper
13 1/4 in. diam.
American Folk Art Museum, gift of Ralph Esmerian, 2005.8.37
Schoolmasters in the Eyer tradition made tunebooks for their students with melodies that were only named in the hymnals. Christian Strenge did this in Lancaster County and during a term he taught in the German townships of northern Chester County. He bound them in heavy paper covers sewn to the pages. In his tunebook for Maria Christmann, he wrote her nickname, “Polly Christm,” on the flyleaf; the book contains melodies for thirty-two hymns. One of several ways a Pennsylvania German youth might extend a token of his love to the girl he admired was to give her a Liebesbrief. Made by “professional” fraktur artists, some of these are dated and bear the name of the donor or even of the recipient. Though they are sometimes called valentines, they were not associated with February 14th and are probably better called by their generic name. A few of Strenge’s love letters have survived, none dated or signed, but all cut in round form with further cutout elements and more than a dozen small hearts with rhyming couplets expressing the donor’s feelings for his “dearest treasure.”
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lillyofthevally:

~  African American Pine Burr quilt,  1920s
~  source :  1st dibs
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cinoh:

w e   a r e   w o r k i n g      s m o c k i n g   h e r e   t o d a y 
t h i s   d r e s s   f r o m   t h e  1 8 0 0 ’ s    i s   i n s p i r a t i o n 
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cinoh:

Titel: “ひろしま/hiroshima#9” Donor: Ogawa, R.© Ishiuchi Miyako
As Ishiuchi writes: “From the 19,000 items made available to me [at the Hiroshima Peace Memorial Museum], I chose things that at one time had touched skin and bodies, and photographed them…. A flower-patterned dress colourfully dyed. A puff of gathered, shiny skirt woven of silk thread. Cool-looking, thin, georgette materials that once shed the summer heat. Used kimonos transformed into blouses and cut to make air-raid hoods…. These objects, exposed to the heat and radioactive rays of a fire ball that suddenly appeared one summer morning, and relinquished by the victims of the atomic bombing, have been on earth as long as I have. When I came to realize the coincidence, I caught my breath at their vivid hues and distinct textures, their flaws and complicated detail. These are too deeply linked to daily lives to regard as ‘historical materials.’”